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Author Topic: Cleveland's next new bird?  (Read 27362 times)
Keith Ryan
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« Reply #60 on: February 11, 2019, 01:58:14 pm »

A certain swift in Autumn, 2018 is surely worth a mention.
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Ian Foster
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« Reply #61 on: February 14, 2019, 08:24:19 pm »

Always worth a mention Keith but was Cleveland's second record (never thought i'd be writing that), so not quite relevant to this thread...I'm sure the official write up in the 2018 Bird report will be a good read though!

Has to be said that afternoon watching that Little Swift bombing around with a Pallid Swift will never be forgotten. More than one local birder has said it was the best bird and birding event they have ever experienced in Cleveland!


Cheers

Ian.

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Ian Foster
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« Reply #62 on: February 23, 2019, 09:24:13 pm »

Good news regarding the Hooded Merganser of May 2018 - BBRC sent a Tweet out today confirming this bird has now been accepted! A tricky bird to connect with and missed by a fair few not reacting quick enough or thinking it would be put down as an escape...Best make it a rule to go see the bird first then worry about it's provenance.


Maybe White-headed Duck, Red-breasted Goose, Ross's Goose, Ruddy Shelduck and even White Pelican could/should make the grade?


Ian.


« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 09:37:48 pm by Ian Foster » Logged
Ian Foster
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« Reply #63 on: February 23, 2019, 10:34:34 pm »

Time Flies When You're Having Fun

So it's now been just over ten years since I started this thread (twenty years since Richard did his predictions) and what a decade it's been!​

The County List stood at 362 back in August 2008 and since then we have had a phenomenal 19 new species added including the recently discovered, not yet accepted Dark-eyed Junco record!

Lets have a quick recap...​
​​
363. Glaucous-winged Gull - 2008​
364. Whiskered Tern - 2009​
365. Black-throated Thrush - 2010​
366. White-throated Robin - 2011​
367. Sandhill Crane  - 2011​
368. Pallid Harrier - 2011​
369. Western Orphean Warbler - 2012​
370. Pallas's Grasshopper Warbler - 2012​
371. Siberian Stonechat - Upgraded to full species status (not sure how we stand with Sibe Chat still on the County list at the moment)!?!
372. Western Bonelli's Warbler - 2013​
373. Black-winged Pratincole - 2014​
374. Black Scoter - 2014​
375. Eastern Crowned Warbler - 2014​
376. Isabelline Wheatear - 2014​
377. Squacco Heron - 2015​
378. Siberian Accentor - 2016​
379. Dark-eyed Junco - 2017
380. Taiga Bean Goose - Upgraded to full species status from January 2018
381. Hooded Merganser - 2018

That is some list, including some incredible birds...we also had the 2014 Fea's type Petrel that was not accepted to species level and Fea's Petrel has now been removed from the British list.

So that leaves us just 19 species short of the magic 400!

Please correct me if I am wrong regarding any of the numbers.

How many did you see? I managed a cool 15 of them!

Could we have a decade like the last? It would take some beating but you just never know, we have still to record our first records of some regularly occurring species like Blyth's Reed Warbler, Isabelline Shrike of some sort or another and Iberian Chiffchaff. Could some of the current Cat.D species be upgraded? Will any future taxonomic splits help us out (White-fronted Geese maybe)?

In the next couple of weeks (ish) I will be taking a fresh look at what I predict could be our next 19 additions to the list...I recently very quickly wrote down a list of species I think are most likely to occur and it added up to exactly 19 species...

Cheers

Ian
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 12:12:53 am by Ian Foster » Logged
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