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Author Topic: Cleveland's next new bird?  (Read 27848 times)
Keith Ryan
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« Reply #60 on: February 11, 2019, 01:58:14 pm »

A certain swift in Autumn, 2018 is surely worth a mention.
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Ian Foster
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« Reply #61 on: February 14, 2019, 08:24:19 pm »

Always worth a mention Keith but was Cleveland's second record (never thought i'd be writing that), so not quite relevant to this thread...I'm sure the official write up in the 2018 Bird report will be a good read though!

Has to be said that afternoon watching that Little Swift bombing around with a Pallid Swift will never be forgotten. More than one local birder has said it was the best bird and birding event they have ever experienced in Cleveland!


Cheers

Ian.

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Ian Foster
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« Reply #62 on: February 23, 2019, 09:24:13 pm »

Good news regarding the Hooded Merganser of May 2018 - BBRC sent a Tweet out today confirming this bird has now been accepted! A tricky bird to connect with and missed by a fair few not reacting quick enough or thinking it would be put down as an escape...Best make it a rule to go see the bird first then worry about it's provenance.


Maybe White-headed Duck, Red-breasted Goose, Ross's Goose, Ruddy Shelduck and even White Pelican could/should make the grade?


Ian.


« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 09:37:48 pm by Ian Foster » Logged
Ian Foster
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« Reply #63 on: February 23, 2019, 10:34:34 pm »

Time Flies When You're Having Fun

So it's now been just over ten years since I started this thread (twenty years since Richard did his predictions) and what a decade it's been!​

The County List stood at 362 back in August 2008 and since then we have had a phenomenal 19 new species added including the recently discovered, not yet accepted Dark-eyed Junco record!

Lets have a quick recap...​
​​
363. Glaucous-winged Gull - 2008​
364. Whiskered Tern - 2009​
365. Black-throated Thrush - 2010​
366. White-throated Robin - 2011​
367. Sandhill Crane  - 2011​
368. Pallid Harrier - 2011​
369. Western Orphean Warbler - 2012​
370. Pallas's Grasshopper Warbler - 2012​
371. Siberian Stonechat - Upgraded to full species status (not sure how we stand with Sibe Chat still on the County list at the moment)!?!
372. Western Bonelli's Warbler - 2013​
373. Black-winged Pratincole - 2014​
374. Black Scoter - 2014​
375. Eastern Crowned Warbler - 2014​
376. Isabelline Wheatear - 2014​
377. Squacco Heron - 2015​
378. Siberian Accentor - 2016​
379. Dark-eyed Junco - 2017
380. Taiga Bean Goose - Upgraded to full species status from January 2018
381. Hooded Merganser - 2018

That is some list, including some incredible birds...we also had the 2014 Fea's type Petrel that was not accepted to species level and Fea's Petrel has now been removed from the British list.

So that leaves us just 19 species short of the magic 400!

Please correct me if I am wrong regarding any of the numbers.

How many did you see? I managed a cool 15 of them!

Could we have a decade like the last? It would take some beating but you just never know, we have still to record our first records of some regularly occurring species like Blyth's Reed Warbler, Isabelline Shrike of some sort or another and Iberian Chiffchaff. Could some of the current Cat.D species be upgraded? Will any future taxonomic splits help us out (White-fronted Geese maybe)?

In the next couple of weeks (ish) I will be taking a fresh look at what I predict could be our next 19 additions to the list...I recently very quickly wrote down a list of species I think are most likely to occur and it added up to exactly 19 species...

Cheers

Ian
« Last Edit: February 24, 2019, 12:12:53 am by Ian Foster » Logged
Ian Foster
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« Reply #64 on: April 28, 2019, 09:53:36 pm »

Well I thought I had better get on with this and post my all Brand New Predictions for the County! Spring is upon us and the next new bird could be just around the corner...



Pacific Diver

A relatively "new" species but starting to be found more regular in Britain and the Western Palearctic. The North East has records from both Yorkshire and Northumberland so I see no reason why Cleveland could not see the next. I'll go with a January bird in Hartlepool Harbour/Fish Quay, although an Inland water is not out of the question.


Black-browed Albatross

A Dream bird for any East Coast Sea-watcher but with a regular Adult summering in Germany, often taking a wander round the North Sea we could very well see this magnificent bird pass one of our sea-watching spots. This bird has visited Yorkshire and been seen passing both the Durham and Northumberland coast line. It surely must have flown through Cleveland waters on the morning of 29th June 2017 before being seen off Whitburn...


Pied-billed Grebe

A bit of a long shot this one I think (but aren't they all). Pied-billed Grebe's are a rare bird. I could be wrong but records seem to be slowing down (other than a couple of regular birds in Argyll and Shetland). There has been records from Yorkshire and Northumberland in the past and more recently a bird in Manchester so maybe the next bird in Northern England might just pay us a visit. Scaling Dam or Crookfoot reservoir must be the most likely locations for one of these.


Lesser Sandplover

As with a lot of species records of Lesser Sandplover appear to have slowed down but I still think we could score one of these one day...Maybe someone will get lucky and find one roosting with Ringed Plover at Newburn, it would be a first for the North East as far as I am aware so maybe wishful thinking?


Greater Sandplover

Like it's lesser cousin records are slowing down but last year one paid a visit to East Yorkshire so you just never know...Once over I would have bet on Seal Sands but maybe Seaton Snook might be a better bet?


Stilt Sandpiper

With approx. 38 British Records that include several East Coast birds, Cleveland could very well be next in line for one of these Stunning Waders. Recent years have seen records from Northumberland, Lincolnshire and Norfolk. A Smart Adult on Saltholme West one August evening would do just fine.


Red-necked Stint

Another Wader that we could very well be next in line for. Still a very rare bird and we don't get a fraction of the numbers of Stints we used to but I still think the Tidal Pool could be graced by one of these one day.

Collared Pratincole

Again another long shot and I was very much in two minds weather to include this species on the list but we did get a Black-winged Pratincole so you just never know! Where would one appear is anyone guess, Cowpen, Brinefields and Seaton Common maybe? I'll go with Saltholme getting the double Pratincole whammy...


Brunnich's Guillemot

Once over this species would have seemed highly unlikely to make this list (and still is I hear everyone muttering) but recent records of live birds from Yorkshire and Fife as well as a very unpredictable bird in Dorset just shows we could be in with a chance. A moribund bird in Hartlepool Harbour following a October Northerly Gale maybe?


Brown Shrike

This once Mega rarity has in the last decade become almost annual in Britain. With over 20 now recorded including at least three from Yorkshire I honestly believe we will see this species in Cleveland before either of the "Isabelline" Shrikes. Most likely site? Who knows...Hartlepool, North Gare, South Gare, Hunt Cliff or Hunley Hall are all in the running...


Daurian Shrike

I'm not going to go on too much about these Isabelline Shrikes and I was very tempted not to include either species on this list. A good species ruined by DNA! At the moment only Adult Males are "apparently" acceptable and the chance of one of those is slim (but not impossible). I think Daurian could occur before Turkestan and maybe one day Adult Females will also be acceptable (not sure about juveniles as it seems DNA can't sort them out!). Or even better they get "lumped" again as one species. Still hard to believe we have never has a "Izzy" Shrike of any form...How about a Stunning adult male in early June on a fence between North Gare and the Zinc Works Road.


Iberian Chiffchaff

As I write (April 27th) this species must be The most likely addition to the county list? A lot of people reading this will have travelled to Portland for a bird back in 1999 when it was still classed as a Mega rarity. There has now been just short of 70 British records and the species has even successfully bred in South Wales! This is a species that can and does occur just about anywhere. I always think Cowpen Bewley Woodland Park would be just perfect for one of these.



Blyth's Reed Warbler

If it were Autumn I would be saying this is The most likey addition to the county list. Not that we are out of a chance in late spring of course...It really is frustrating that we have not recorded a Blyth's Reed Warbler. Most East Coast counties have multiple records...we have simply just missed out! It is now classed as a scarce migrant rather than a rarity and one even spent this winter in Manchester!!! Surely, surely this is the year we put this species to bed? I recon Chris Brown will Bag our first BRW.



Sykes's Warbler

A hard one this. Very rare and very good views or a trapped bird will be needed but Northumberland has recorded this species. I believe Yorkshire is surprisingly still awaiting it's first (correct me if I am wrong) so could a Cleveland bird on the South Side please all parties? I bet Damian wouldn't mind finding one of these in his nets up on Hunt Cliff...



Moltoni's Subalpine Warbler

One of those "New" species. Not yet recorded in the North East but records are increasing (could very well be annual) and it's only a matter of time before one is found. South Gare has a good record for Sub Alps so that's where id put my money.



Siberian Rubythroat

Once considered the Holy Grail of British Birding...There has now been about 15 records of this Mega Sibe and although I cannot see it ever going the way of Red-flanked Bluetail, I think records will continue to increase and a Twitchable East coast bird is long over due. Remember one of these visited a Co. Durham garden several years ago...The Outer Bowling Green at Hartlepool or South Gare's Bomb Hole will do just fine!



Collared Flycatcher

They don't come much better than a Male Collared Fly! Records are increasing I believe and birds have graced both Northumberland and Yorkshire (at least twice). Several sites could easily host one of these stunners (St. Mary's, Hartlepool, Locke Park...) but i'll go with Hunley Hall, late May...This May with any luck!


Stejnegers Stonechat

Recently split from Siberian Stonechat and only DNA'd birds are currently acceptable but with Cleveland's excellent track record of Sibe Chats (11 records?) It must be a good contender. It appears this may be a fairly regular vagrant to Britain in late autumn. South Gare must be a good bet and hopefully one will be seen to have a crap on a fence post!


Blyth's Pipit

Another bird i'm not 100% I should have included. Rare and quite difficult to I.D but they are out there and a well twitched bird was found in West Yorkshire a few year ago so you just never know. Old Cemetary at Hartlepool could easily host one of these as could several other sites. Even a wintering bird on Cowpen Marsh wouldn't be out of the question.


Other Species considered and all probably just as likely or unlikely as several that made my list...

White-winged Scoter
Little Crake
Killdeer
Least Sandpiper
Audouin's Gull (had this in my top 19 but dropped it last minute...)
Sooty Tern
Turkestan Shrike
Eastern Bonelli's Warbler
Lanceolated Warbler
Dartford Warbler
White's Thrush


So there we have it, nineteen species listed that would take the Cleveland list to the Magic 400!


Please let me know what your thoughts are and feel free to correct me on any of the above (I wrote most of this from memory except checking a few details in BBRC reports).


Cheers

Ian.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2019, 10:14:16 pm by Ian Foster » Logged
Damian
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« Reply #65 on: April 29, 2019, 09:19:06 pm »

Think I'll pass on the Sykes Ian, they don't do much for me if I'm honest. Id take the rubythroat or Collared Fly though...
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Ian Foster
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« Reply #66 on: April 29, 2019, 11:01:19 pm »

Ha! Don't blame you Damian. Think I dealt you a bum deal there... Grin
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Ian Foster
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« Reply #67 on: May 12, 2019, 03:07:45 pm »

Incredible to think that three of the species on my prediction list were present in Yorkshire yesterday...
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