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Author Topic: Saltholme Pools hide and the England Coast Path  (Read 1562 times)
Craig_Mc
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« on: June 20, 2018, 10:26:58 am »

There’s some exciting developments beginning within the next few weeks both in and around Saltholme.

The latest instalment of the Saltholme Washlands Project will be underway from Monday 2 July 2018. This initial phase will see work begin on Saltholme Pools hide, as we begin installation of the long awaited tower infill, giving spectacular elevated views across Saltholme Pools and its soon to be re-landscaped edges.
This does mean that from Monday 2 July Saltholme Pools hide will be closed until the work on both hide and landscaping is complete, which is expected to be around mid-September. There’ll still be access along the dragon fly path to the viewing screen looking over Back Saltholme and of course the ongoing works.


Also on Monday 2 July work will be starting on the next phase of the England Coast Path across Saltholme East. The bus stop by Huntsman Drive will be closed to all vehicles and pedestrians for the duration of the work, which is expected to take up to 7 weeks.
The England Coast Path will link up parts of our wonderful reserve rarely accessed by anyone and will allow our wonderful wildlife to be enjoyed by even more of our visitors.
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IanF
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2018, 06:50:46 pm »

It was mentioned in passing today that due to some delays in the work commencing that Saltholme Hide will now remain open until 16th July. Though that date may not be fixed.
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Craig_Mc
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2018, 09:48:55 am »

Thanks Ian, Yes work is currently scheduled to start on the 16 July so Saltholme Pools hide will remain open until then. We'll keep you updated as we know more.
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IanF
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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2018, 08:57:22 pm »

Notice of hide closure and picture of new design.


* DSCN8171a.JPG (170.03 KB, 900x633 - viewed 131 times.)
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sidwemn
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2018, 07:08:36 pm »

There have been a number of concerns raised over the past few months regarding RSPB's management of Saltholme Reserve, in particular, cutting back vegetation on the Dorman's Pool Hide access path at a time when young birds were still present and using this vegetation for cover.

The latest concern relates to the English Coast Path built next to the A178 alongside Salthome East Pool. The final element of this work was completed this week, when a barbed wire fence was added, segregating the path from the pool.  

For anyone unsure of what barbed wire fences can do, please read this BBC News article from Spurn Point recently.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-humber-44211629

I have seen a similar incident myself first hand. Believe me it's not a pretty sight. Locally, we had a similar incident on Long Drag a number of years ago.

I raised concerns via Twitter today. RSPB Saltholme have replied that "it wasn't them it was Stockton Council".

Lets make things clear, this fence is on part of RSPB Salthome Reserve. I accept that there are a lot of barbed wire fences in the local area, including many fences on the reserve itself. Removal of the barbed wire would take a lot of time and money. I am amazed however, that barbed wire is still being used on new fences, and that the RSPB seem happy to sit back and do nothing about it.

As both a member of Teesmouth Bird Club & the RSPB, I ask that this matter can be taken up by both the Bird Club and RSPB, with Stockton Council and have the barbed wire removed as soon as possible

Thank You
Martyn Sidwell
« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 07:24:31 pm by sidwemn » Logged
Keith Ryan
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2018, 08:25:42 am »

Imagine what would happen if a cyclist using the footpath, and they will, came off at speed, and on to that barbed wire. Also a lot of birds frequently cross from one pool to another, it won't take long before one gets tagged.
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A McLee
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« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2018, 02:48:54 pm »

The club has already informed the project manager of Stockton borough responsible for this ECP section of the path, and Chris Francis of Saltholme. Once the ownership and responsibilities have been allocated the club has been assured that actions will be taken.
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Jamie
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2018, 01:26:08 pm »

When Saltholme was initially been built I noticed the amount of barbed wire they were using and raised my concerns with Toby and Dave Braithwaite when I bumped into them but they said they had never heard of it been an issue.

Myself I have seen various birds stuck on it including a Sand Martin on Dorman's Pool that got its wing stuck and was wrapping itself round the barbed wire.

Here is a picture Keith Ryan took on the Long Drag in 2015:-



* LongDragDeer.jpg (133.65 KB, 614x1024 - viewed 128 times.)
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IanF
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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2018, 10:11:47 pm »

In case anyone was unaware, Saltholme Hide reopened yesterday.
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